The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time at 20 – An Experience for the Ages

20 years ago, Nintendo released what would become one of the most influential video games for the next 20 years.  From slashing monsters to solving dungeon mazes, from open-world exploration to creating a destiny. Its a game that had everything. Who knew a 32MB cartridge could hold so much magic?

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There are many words to describe the Ocarina of Time experience. The one that springs to mind today, looking back on the unforgettable experiences Ocarina of Time delivers, is preparation. The vivid introduction begins with the subtle sound of a horse galloping. What follows is an almost-soothing soft-piano number that seamlessly transforms into one of Ocarina of Time’s many mournful melodies. It serves as a taste of things to come; danger, discovery, destiny. It is one of many sequences that was technologically innovative of the time, whilst still remaining incredibly evocative today. And so, 20 years ago this week, one of the world’s greatest and most important video games, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, was released.

Any entry into the Legend of Zelda series is a noteworthy release of anyone’s gaming calendar. But even this, coming 6 years after the grand adventure A Link to the Past, was an epic 3D open-world adventure that didn’t seem possible until it became reality. Coming at a time when the journalistic written word and screenshots were the only viable means of hype, it was there in abundance.

This was the N64’s biggest release to date, and it showed; upon its UK release on 11th December 1998, it was quickly a sought-after item due to a stock shortage. Its impact was clearly underestimated, and 17-year-old me was a hugely despondent figure upon missing out on that initial supply. That is until, on one college lunch break, I stumbled across a game store that had just opened in time for the Christmas rush. And there it was: the final copy in the shop. Its simplistic yet gold-on-black box art glistening at me. It was my very own ‘what’s in the chest’ Zelda moment, in retrospect. Indeed, Ocarina of Time was the birth of those treasure-finding moments, which has become a series-constant ever since. Even with all the hype, perfect reviews and scores, only upon that first glimpse of the iconic introduction prepared me for what was to come.

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For what is now remembered as a childhood classic, Ocarina of Time is a bleak and scary tale at times. Link’s initial and indicative nightmare of Princess Zelda fleeing from Hyrule Castle and being pursued by the demonic Ganandorf is a lot for a young lad to deal with. All things considered, I managed OK. But all jokes aside, there is a lot of burden placed upon our young Link. His transition into a young man is akin to that of Simba in The Lion King; his forced absence has led his homeland into ruin, and only he can stop the evil that has corrupted it. If you think about it, it’s pretty deep.

There are plenty of other scary moments, too. The first time you are frozen on the spot by the shriek of a Gibdo mummy instils immediate panic. The collectable Skulltullas have a house in Kakariko Village, where a family has been morphed into spiders with skull faces, is another hugely unsettling moment. The sense of duty bound as you make your way up Death Mountain as boulders come down at you. Or vanquishing each dense dungeon throughout the game.

But all these burdens are merely the sum of its parts; From the moment you first take control of Link to the last, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is a magical experience. Exploring the quirky Kakariko Village and its interactive inhabitants. The underwater domain of the Zora’s. The maze-like Lost Woods. That first venture out onto Hyrule Field. All these areas and more are simply a joy to behold.

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Then there is the score which is a thing of beauty. The Hyrule Field theme is among the most stirring of Koji Kondo’s score. The theme of Kakariko village offers safety and sanctuary; often the case when running from the dangers of Hyrule Field. It is a soundtrack that traces Link’s journey from childhood prophecy to man of destiny with such aplomb it is no surprise to see it still rank among videogame’s greatest ever soundtracks. Then there is the music Link plays on command, courtesy of the simple chords denoted against the N64 C-button formation. Link can change day to night and vice versa, teleport to key locations, even summon your horse, Epona.

Where the treasured visuals, ambience and tonal shifts prepare you for different experiences on offer, the execution and vividness of the Ocarina of Time experience is something else to behold. Once the quest is over, that feeling of accomplishment is mirrored with reflection on Ocarina of Time’s vivid dungeons, be they beautiful (Forest Temple) or exasperating (Water Temple). And the bosses too remain vivid in the memory. The need to quickly shift from fire to ice against Twinrova, the grandstand final battle against Ganondorf/Ganon, even fighting a shadow version of yourself. I have found myself talking about them at some point for years and years now.

The genius and significance of Ocarina of Time lives on today. Not just through its various re-packages or Virtual Console releases, either. To say this was the first game of its kind and get so much of it right first time is simply incredible. The z-targeting system is used in some form even in games of today. The Grand Theft Auto and Red Dead Redemption series allows you to centre on your given target. As does other series such as Bayonetta. Many of today’s games have hint systems for fear you could get lost, and Navi is Ocarina of Time’s answer to that.

Like many of Nintendo’s beloved back catalogue, Ocarina of Time remains remarkably on-point today. It is no surprise that following its release Ocarina of Time would go on to dominate Top 10 lists for years and years. There may be many experiences like it today, particularly from Nintendo themselves given this became the blueprint, but Ocarina of Time is still up there with the best. It is a magical adventure that will no doubt live on forever.

 

My Top 5 Games of 2017

2017 was some year for video games. The Xbox One and PS4 showing their true capabilities. The arrival of the Nintendo Switch. The impact of the Nintendo Switch. I cannot comment on PC and 3DS because i’m a poor man who cannot afford all of the games and systems. Man i’d love a gaming PC.

Anyway, back to 2017. Here are the 5 games I enjoyed the most. Before you skim down and click away in anger, there are some notable mentions that didn’t qualify. This is simply because I only had limited experience with them, despite first impressions being excellent.

Notable Mentions

Super Mario Odyssey (Switch):-

I am yet to own a Nintendo Switch. Note the word ‘yet’, because there are a few games already that make it scream ‘buy me’. Super Mario Odyssey is absolutely one of those games.

With just an hour or so into Odyssey, I am already in love with it, and in awe of it. The mysterious Cap Kingdom. The landscape of Cascade Kingdom. The beautiful Sand Kingdom. I’ve barely scratched the surface but I already know i’m in for something special.

Yakuza Kimawi (PS4):-

Whenever i see Yakuza, I immediately think of Shenmue. The combat is certainly familiar. This remake of the original, which I missed the first time around on PS2, oozes coolness. Like Mario Odyssey, I’ve only managed but a few minutes, but I can already tell this is going to be a time-devouring experience to remember. It is certainly reminiscent of Shenmue in all the right ways. Did I mention I miss Shenmue?

And now, let’s see what’s behind door #5….

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#5 – Pro Evolution Soccer 2018 (PS4)

Those that know me won’t be surprised by this entry, given that I love football. But even this, the 17th installment of Konami’s football series, took me by surprise. Up until the series’ transition onto the PS3/Xbox 360 platforms I was always a PES guy. Pro Evolution Soccer 6 is still the greatest football sim known to man. That’s just scientific fact.

I did jump ship to the much-improved and package-heavy FIFA series from ’09-’17. But I grew tired of FIFA’s increasingly unbalanced gameplay. After a taster of the series’ improving game with 2015/2016, I’m back for 2018. And it was worth the wait for many reasons.

First and foremost, Master League. The greatest league mode of any video game football simulation, is back in my life. It’s had a few media-style tweaks that are pretty pointless, but mirror today’s media-heavy approach. Getting yourself a edited data patch online adds to the experience much more. It isn’t official, but allows you to emulate competing in the Premier League, Serie A, etc along with the Champions/Europa Leagues, which are officially licensed. It can be life-consuming, but exhilarating no less.

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But what about the football itself? Master the basics and even the most novice players will be stringing one-touch passing moves together. The key is build up play, and it’s as precise as you want it to be. Passing/crosses/build-up is everything. Like the real thing.

Expect a challenge the other way, also. Defending isn’t easy with the games biggest gameplay issue: slide-tackling. Regardless of position, any tap of the slide button means a full-on tackle. And most likely a foul. That aside, you can press as freely and as high up the pitch as you want, and instruct team mates to do the same. Or not, if that’s your tactical nuance.

And finally, the cost. I managed to get PES 2018 Premium Edition for £38 (before trade-ins). FIFA 18’s standard cost is typical EA at £50/55. Plus EA want you spend even more within the game also. Don’t fall for it.

PES 2018 is an excellent football title. That data edit patch is a must for any true football fan to want it, and it’s worth a few minutes of hassle. As Konami would say, the pitch is ours. With PES 2018, you can make it yours.

Next, what’s behind door #4?

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#4 – The Walking Dead: A New Frontier (PS4)

I reviewed this back in June. Check it out for the full low-down.

Off the back of the shocking ending to season 2, Telltale’s 3rd season certainly raises an eyebrow or two. Firstly, another change in lead character was initially disappointing. Disgraced baseball player Javier Carlos is an initially flaky individual, particularly around his family. But in true Telltale storytelling style, enough backstory is presented to make your own mind up. And more importantly, make the decisions. But fear not Clementine fans (me included), for she still plays a pivotal role in this penultimate season.

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There isn’t any change to the Telltale formula, but it’s fair to say there doesn’t need to be. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it, right? Telltale’s success is in it’s storytelling. Don’t like how certain decisions turn out? Then it’s worth a replay to see how things differ.

You want character investment? Telltale have become masters of that across most of their series. But The Walking Dead is still their best work. And come the end A New Frontier, you won’t be left wanting. Except for the next series of course.

And now for #3….

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#3 – Sonic Mania (PS4)

Well. Sonic Mania is quite the renaissance, isn’t it? Classic Sonic graphics, classic Sonic gameplay, classic Sonic characters. And while it starts out as an HD remix of sorts, revisiting levels from Sonic 1 + 2, Sonic Mania quickly becomes so much more.

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Granted if you were never a Sonic fan then 1) what is wrong with you? and 2) this could be the one to get you invested. Christian “Taxman” Whitehead has successfully created a brilliant hybrid of Sonic’s best 2D elements. On top of that, there is plenty of new content to justify Sonic Mania being a whole new adventure. And unlike Sonic Generations, the last decent Sonic title, none of that 3D third-person rubbish. It simply doesn’t work for the world’s most well-known hedgehog.

But Sonic Mania does work. On all levels. It has odes to the best Sonic has had to offer over the last 25+ years. Granted, of the 13 Zones on offer only 4 are wholly original. But most have originally developed ‘Acts’ designed against old backdrops such as the Green Hill and Chemical Plant Zones. There’s even a tribute to Mean Bean Machine thrown in for good measure. Add on top of that a host of unlock-able items/modes through in-game special stages, plus Chaos Emeralds to capture, and that’s the longevity sorted.

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And the special stages in particular are a nice addition. Reminiscent of the Sonic CD equivalent stages, they are nostalgia-tinged throwbacks to the 16-bit era. The Mode-7 racetrack-style courses are fluid and fast; something your reactions need to be as you collects rings to keep the timer going, and orbs in order to catch up to each Emerald. And you’ll want to collect them, for it is the only way to fully complete Sonic Mania.

At less than £20 it’s well worth it, whether you’re a fan or a newcomer. Sonic Mania is a retro-based reminder that 2D Sonic is and always will be the best Sonic.

And for my #2 pick of 2017…..

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#2 – MLB The Show ’17 (PS4)

Now this is most definitely the surprise pick of the year. I don’t watch Baseball. I don’t know any current rosters. Hell I can barely even name 10 teams. But such was the praise for Sony’s twelfth MLB installment i’d have been mad not to at least try it. And boy does it ever hit a home run.

MLB The Show ’17 is possibly the most comprehensive sports sim I have ever experienced. Given my little knowledge of the sport, the excellent tutorials get you up to scratch with little fuss/expectation. You can pitch/bat with whatever camera view suits you best, or even choose whatever TV coverage style you want. There is local co-op, online play, season mode and a franchise mode, which gives you control over and above the team on the field.

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The fielding and batting mechanics are pretty much perfect. You can swing with the tap of a button or with a swing of the analog stick. You can control all bases in sync or individually. The amount of functions and features goes on and on. To list everything MLB The Show ’17 has to offer for beginners through to seasoned professionals would simply be too much.

One new feature of note is the Retro Mode; a simplistic single-game mode that provides an excellent, top-level game of baseball for single/co-op play. It is visualised with 8-bit style block-graphics and thinner backdrops. It is an excellent mode to pick up the basics of the rules and batting/fielding timings.

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I haven’t even touched on the ‘Road to the show’ mode, where you create then guide a player through their career. From managing the bases to your contract, your social media profile to your attitude.

MLB The Show ’17 is incredible value for money. I picked this up for half price a few months down the line, but come March I will be looking for the best price for MLB The Show ’18. It is quite possibly the best sports sim series ever made.

And finally…..#1

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Come on Rey TELL ME!!!

#1 – The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Wii U)

I think it’s fair to say that most who have experienced Breath of the Wild would make it their top pick. BotW is a genre-defining, mind-blowing experience that just has to be played.

The open-world environment is simply huge and awe-inspiring. The physics engine is tremendously detailed. The visuals are incredible, beautiful and, as a whole, is a brilliant adventure. Breath of the Wild takes elements from its already-greatest hits, as well as a few others (Skyrim being one example), and expands them exponentially.

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There isn’t much left to say about Breath of the Wild that hasn’t already been said elsewhere. But there is a reason it has appeared on almost all 2017 Game of the Year listings. The anticipation alone led to 4 million sales for the Nintendo Switch, a perfect jump-start for Nintendo. It also served as a perfect swansong for the under-performing Wii U, managing to shift just over 1 million copies.

It’s release on the Wii U is something I am thankful for. Being 1 of the 1 million to own a copy on Wii U, it gave me the chance to experience one of the most immersive worlds ever committed to code. I urge you to do the same if you haven’t already. Breath of the Wild isn’t just the best video game of 2017; it’s the best game in years.

So that’s my top games of 2017, what were yours? Leave a comment below!

Super NES Classic Edition Mini – Lowdown on the Games (Part 2)

Join me as i rundown the games for the highly anticipated Super Nes Mini.

In September 2017 the dreams of retro videogames fans around the world were realised once again. The successor to the sold-out NES Mini, the Super NES Mini, hit stores worldwide. The Super NES Mini will follow the mould of the NES Mini by including 21 of the most classic games the platform has ever produced.

You can read part one here. If those titles weren’t enough to whet the retro appetite, wait until you see what’s in store with the next 4 games. I’ve invested hour upon hour into this particular set in the last 20+ years. Like most of the titles included in the SNES Mini, they cemented my interest in video games as a medium for life.

The Locked 16 (5-8):-

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Kirby Super Star

Developer: HAL Laboratory

Publisher: Nintendo

Original Sales: 1.4 Million

The SNES Mini may include 21 games for a fixed price, but Kirby Super Star offers a surprise right off the bat. 1 title, 8 games! Okay so they’re all a little on the slender side, but Kirby Super Star is a title bursting with variety.

Kirby’s core ‘copy’ ability, allowing him to mimic abilities of those he ingests, is also the core theme each game is constructed around. This could mean Kirby wielding a sword, a laser cannon, or maybe even singing enemies to death. The most recognisable is Spring Breeze; essentially a SNES version of the original Game Boy Kirby’s Dream Land, albeit somewhat simplified.

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Other delights include Gourmet Race, where Kirby and King Dedede race across 3 levels whilst devouring as much food as possible, and The Arena, a gauntlet-style boss fight mode. The meatiest portion of this Kirby all-you-can-eat buffet is Milky-Way Wishes. Kirby must traverse over 9 planets in the same vein as any regular Kirby title, but with 1 subtle difference; Kirby can no longer obtain abilities from ingested enemies, Instead, you collect ability-laden items, much like the Super Mario series.

Each slice of this Kirby pizza pie has it’s own unique and fun topping. Some may be more filling than others, but there is something for everyone in this great package.

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The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

Developer: Nintendo

Publisher: Nintendo

Original Sales: 4.6 Million

What is there left to be said for what is simply one of the best games of all time? It is simply a remarkably profound experience from start to finish. What’s even more remarkable is that it is still a brilliant game, more than 20 years on.

A Link to the Past has been re-released, remastered, and most important of all, replayed so many times. Ocarina of Time is the Zelda entry that has dominated so many best-games-ever lists. The sublime Breath of the Wild is sure to carry on that mantle for the next few years. But this 16-bit predecessor is still significant to this day. It’s nowhere near the biggest interpretation of Hyrule but it is still very big. Factor in teleportation to-and-from a Ganon-corrupted mirror image of Hyrule and it doubles in size and difficulty.

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The layered labyrinth-style dungeons, the vast array of tools and weapons, finding heart pieces. Yes all these are series stables to this day, but A Link to the Past is still capable of ingenious surprises; thieves in the woods after your stuff, bunny transformations (yes, really) and of course, the amazing Hookshot.

A Link to the Past is always a journey worth revisiting. It was one of my very first SNES experiences as a teenager, and often revisit on a semi-regular basis. Come September 29th, I intend to visit the world of Hyrule all over again. I recommend you do to.

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Mega Man X

Developer: Capcom

Publisher: Nintendo

Original Sales: 1.1 Million

There’s an impression left by the Mega Man series that screams “they’re all just the same”. In the case of Mega Man 1-6 that is evident, with Mega Man 2 being the standout exception. Screenshots of the series’ upgrade to the SNES does little to suggest more of the same. Thankfully Mega Man X is anything but.

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The ‘X’ is not just a fancy spin off name (i’m looking at you Apple), but the birth of both a new character AND series. Dr Light’s supreme invention no longer has to rely on the abilities of defeated bosses; upgrades such as dashing and superior armour are also acquired throughout. At it’s core it is of course a Mega Man game. But these new dynamics, accompanied by excellent level design and freedom to tackle them how you want makes for the ultimate Mega Man experience. Plus it’s still pretty mutha-truckin’ hard to boot.

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Secret of Mana

Developer: Square

Publisher: Square

Original Sales: 1.8 Million

Ooh boy. Secret of Mana is a beast of an RPG. The premise is fairly simple; boy finds legendary sword, and is immediately tasked with saving the world. In between is an action RPG that hits all the right notes. It also provides a rare multiplayer experience for the genre, with up to 3 players on screen at once.

Secret of Mana’s initial moments play out in a similar vein to A Link to the Past. Once the first series of battles commence, Mana cements itself as an RPG with it’s intuitive menu system. This ‘ring menu’ system results in quick command prompts to use spells/items, with little intrusion on battles. All characters move freely during battle, a la Zelda, but weapon attacks require a brief pause to recharge to ensure a hit and more damage. This brilliant blend of real-time and turn-based combat makes for often-exhilarating boss battles.

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Memorable melodies of Mana soon become ingrained in the mind thanks to one of the greatest soundtracks of it’s kind. And like Zelda, Mana makes use of the SNES’ patented Mode 7 effects for the overworld map, with Mana’s world made up of several islands as opposed to Zelda’s solitary land with multiple landmarks. In the later stages the back and forth travelling can get a little confusing. Particularly when you step away for while and jump back in……yes, i am currently lost in my most recent play-through and haven’t the patience to get back on track.

But despite my lack of bearings and memory, Secret of Mana is a hugely enjoyable and engrossing RPG. Its many hours of combat, collecting, travelling and storytelling are one of the SNES’ most cherished experiences.

8 down, 12 to go! Are you excited yet? You should be! Catch you next time!

 

My ‘Final Games’

One of my favourite podcasts, Final Games, is to video games what BBC’s Desert Island Discs is to music. Each episode a different guest details their 8 video game choices they would take with them to a hypothetical deserted location for the rest of their days.

So, in Final Games tradition, I will include my choices with a sample of music from each, and my reasons for each choice. Enjoy.

Tetris (Gameboy, 1990):-

There are many iterations of Tetris, but for me all pale in comparison in quality, simplicity, and sheer importance to video games than the Gameboy version. The tile-matching puzzle titan was the original mobile gaming phenomenon that brought gaming to the masses. It helped launch video games into the mainstream and many of its derivatives appeal to those who even don’t consider themselves a gamer.

Back in 1989/90 when physical console multiplayer connections were a must, I often challenged a friend who lived around the corner, visiting each other’s homes to spend hours on linked battle mode.

Tetris is the perfect pickup and play game, whether it’s a bus journey, your lunch break at work, or simply the need to engage your brain for any amount of time.

Super Mario Bros 3 (NES, 1991):-

The Christmas of 1991 I received my very own Nintendo Entertainment System, along with the latest Super Mario game – Super Mario Bros 3.

Mario games were easily the benchmark for all platformers today, 2D/3D, and back then, this was the benchmark. The overworld map, suits (frog, hammer and Tanooki) and the super leaf were all introduced here, and have been mainstays ever since.

At 10-years-old I wasn’t great at video games but I herald beating Super Mario bros 3 as my earliest gaming triumph.

 

The Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past (SNES, 1992):-

Link to the Past was the first video game I’d ever bought 2nd hand back in 1993/4. LttP is a game I make a time-honoured tradition of playing through each year. Like Super Mario World, it was another masterpiece released around the launch of the Super Nintendo, and simply timeless.

From the dramatic opening, essentially a tutorial which serves as a perfect insight into the themes of discovery and survival the game brings, Link to the Past is simply one of the best adventure games ever to be coded, and a journey I implore everyone to take at least once in their lifetime.

 

Chrono Trigger (SNES 1995, 2008)

The supergroup collaboration of Final Fantasy creator Hironobu Sakaguchi, Dragon Quest creator Yuji Hori, Dragonball and Z creator Akira Toriyama plus script writer Masoto Kato simply created a masterpiece in role-playing and storytelling. Despite its standard JRPG appearance Chrono Trigger is bolstered by its time travel mechanic, resulting is a story that transcends thousands of years and consists of love, tragedy, and friendship, with 13 different endings on offer.

Neither the SNES or the PS1 versions were released in Europe, and it wasn’t until around 2001 that I managed to grab a decent boxed copy – but it set me back £92. Once it finally got it’s 2008 DS release, my dream was realised. 13 years of hype and it did not disappoint.

 

Pro Evolution Soccer 6 (PS2, 2006):-

If I’m going to live out my days alone in a deserted location, then I’m going to need my football fill.

Since its release in 2006 I have spent hour upon ungodly hour challenging the incredible Master League mode; easily the greatest single player football mode in any football game ever made.

The beauty of the PES series is that as you raised the bar, so did the game in its challenge and learning curve.

A joy to play, difficult to put down, PES 6 is the football game I would take to my grave.

 

Bayonetta 2 (Wii U, 2014):-

Bayonetta 2 is simply a masterpiece. Yusuke Hashimoto’s sequel to Hideki Kamiya’s incredible Bayonetta achieved what few sequels do: not only replicate what made the original a success, but also improve every element.

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The combat is simply a masterclass, the art direction stunning, the pacing tighter, truly improving what was already a perfect original. Despite the main campaign taking around 10 hours, there is so much more to perfect resulting in a title that could possibly be played forever, with secrets to find, scores/grades to beat, combos to create and perfect; Bayonetta 2 is simply incredible.

 

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (N64, 1998):-

OoT is simply the most incredible video game ever devised. Enjoy Oblivion/Skyrim? Dark Souls/Bloodborne? The Witcher? OoT is the blueprint for all of those and many more.

It was released 2 weeks before Christmas in 1998 and in truth I did little else in the advent lead up than sample its delightful open world, fall in love with the combat mechanics, savour the magnificent soundtrack, and surrender myself to the contentment that the game delivers.

Following its 3DS remake and release in 2011 I once again stepped into Link’s shoes and it is as much a joy to play now as it was almost 20 years ago, and I’m sure I could say the same in another 20 years.

 

Final Fantasy VII (PS1, 1997):-

Cloud’s journey to stop world-controlling corporation Shinra from draining the world’s life essence for fuel resource has everything: friends, enemies, love, tragedy, death, and one of the greatest antagonist’s in video game history, Sephiroth.

Tscus_94163_07042008_191550_0015he beauty of Final Fantasy VII is its pacing, the turn-based combat, the incredible backdrops, levelling system, and so much more. The sprites may now look a little outdated, but the rendered backdrops really capture the mood and condition of the slums people must live in, and the open world is truly a feast for the eyes.

Final Fantasy VII is the only game in the series I’ve gone back to, having finished it twice, and still desire to go back to on a regular basis. When the time comes, it is a journey I would gladly take once again.

 

 

 

 

 

My 52 Game Challenge of 2014

2014 was a great year for gaming. Particularly for me, as I decided to undertake the ultimate lonely gamer task: complete 52 games in a calendar year. That works out at just shy of 4.5 games a month. Ouch.

Now I’m typically a gamer who starts many games, but takes forever to finish them. Save points are often my weak point in that I often to decide to call it quits once I reach one. Note to RPG makers: NO MORE SAVE POINTS, autosave all the way please.

Anyway, although late one, I completed the challenge. A simple feat for a lonely gamer such as myself, if I’d not started it in June! Yes, that’s 52 games completed in 6 months. And here they are:-

Xbox Live Arcade:-

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

Streets of Rage 2

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Arcade

Streets of Rage 3

TMNT: Turtles in Time Re-Shelled

Street Fighter III Third Strike

Final Fight

X-Men

Sonic Adventure 2

The Walking Dead Season 2

King of Fighters ’98

 

Xbox 360:-

Lego Batman 2

PES 2015 (Champions League)

 

PSN – Duck Tales Remastered

 

3DS:-

The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

Sega 3D Classics: Sonic The Hedgehog

Sega 3D Classics: Shinobi III

Kirby Triple Deluxe

Fantasy Life

Super Mario 3D Land

 

Wii U:-

Super Mario 3D World

Mario Kart 8 (Special Cup)

Bayonetta 2

 

Wii – Kirby’s Epic Yarn

 

Gamecube – Capcom Vs. SNK 2

 

Nintendo 64 – Lylat Wars

 

Gameboy:-

TMNT: Fall of the Foot Clan

Kirby’s Dream Land

Super Mario Land

Super Mario Bros Deluxe

Donkey Kong Land

 

SNES:-

TMNT: Turtles in Time

Mickey’s Magical Quest

Final Fight 2

Excitebike: Bun Bun Mario Battle Stadium

The Great Circus Mystery Starring Mick and Minnie Mouse

Aladdin

Super Castlevania IV

Street Fighter Alpha 2

Castlevania: Dracula X

Starwing

Donkey Kong Country

 

Mega Drive/Genesis – TMNT: The Hyperstone Heist

 

Master System – Sonic The Hedgehog

 

NES:-

TMNT 3: The Manhattan Project

Castlevania

Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse

Where’s Waldo?

Super Mario Bros 2

Duck Tales 2

 

Turbografix – Castlevania: Rondo of Blood

 

Arcade – Sunset Riders

 

Particular highlights from this list have been many, but the standouts are Kirby’s Epic Yarn, A Link Between Worlds, 3D World, Fantasy Life and Bayonetta 2. LOVE THAT GAME. Not many particularly lengthy titles I know, with Fantasy Life probably the longest, but there were some tough cookies, the standout being Castlevania’s III and Dracula X. But that was the beauty of the challenge; it drove me on to finish even those difficult titles, in order to move onto the next one.

I shall once again be undertaking the challenge in 2015, in fact, if I get to 52 in 6 months again, I may well go for ANOTHER 52! I shall keep you all updated on here, plus I shall Instagram and Tweet each game as I finish them.

How about you, are you up for the challenge?